Updating in mysql

// it knows to convert NULL and NOW() from a string// insert() parameters// table name (ideally defined as a constant, but did not for this example)// assoc array with data (does not need escaped)// insert() returns// primary id of the inserted record.

you can collect or ignoreaffected_rows// returns the number of rows in a table affected by your query// can be used after UPDATE query (to see how many rows are updated)// can be used after SELECT query (to see how many rows will be returned)Since it's a singleton, when you "create" your second $db_2 it's just reusing the first object, not opening/creating a new connection.

Since it's a singleton, when you "create" your second $db_2 it's just reusing the first object, not opening/creating a new connection.

That's what I get for copy & pasting the documentation from v2 without testing. You really shouldn't really use a singleton if you need to handle multiple connections from the same page.

updating in mysql-78updating in mysql-8updating in mysql-46

I will keep this page here indefinitely as a reference, but it will no longer be updated and I no longer offer support of any kind regarding content found on this page.

Your explanation is very clear and so are the examples. You say if you need to call the $db object in a function or class you can do this by using: $db=Database::obtain(); I have the following class example: I get an error when calling the $db this way.

If i put the $db object inside the get_images function it works correct.

I suggest you move some of this logic (maybe the BEFORE trigger) to your code.

Reason #2: AFTER_DELETE sometimes fails with error 1235 You should avoid using AFTER_DELETE triggers.

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